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Category Archives: GSoC2010

The importance of mentorship in Google Summer of Code

I’ve been asked by Lydia, the ultimate social media ninja of KDE and Amarok’s community manager to put together a brief post about my opinions on the importance of mentorship and organization in a student outreach program such as Google Summer of Code based on my experience as a GSoC student. I’ve been a GSoC student twice and a volunteer Summer of KDE student the year before that, so I hope I can provide some insight from a student’s point of view. The KDE GSoC admins&mentors team has done a terrific job so far, and I’m very satisfied with their performance. Thank you, GSoC admins&mentors!

I have tried to gather a list of situations where as a GSoC student I could greatly benefit from good mentorship:

  • Planning. While I surely did have a vision and a somewhat clear direction where I wanted to take my project, I wasn’t always sure about the details of the implementation, and specifically how and where to tie my stuff in with the existing codebase. My mentor helped me a lot with planning and design, and we shared a design document in Google Docs that was to be kept up to date for the duration of the GSoC program. I believe that while the strong motivation of a student pushes the project forward, the direction has to be overseen and frequently discussed with the mentor to make the student’s project useful for the organization and to avoid rookie mistakes when laying out the design.
  • Code review. When I started with GSoC I was very much a noob about Qt and I didn’t have a lot of coding experience. Regular code review by my mentor and the other team members was very important to improve the quality of my output. I believe that at least occasional code reviews in the first weeks of the GSoC program (unrelated to the final review before merging the branch) can straighten out important details before they become serious issues later on.
  • Team interaction. When I started with GSoC I didn’t know anybody in the Amarok team. I didn’t know anything about the social structure and most importantly, I didn’t know which team member I should poke about specific parts of the codebase. In those times it was very important for me to have someone (mentor, community manager) to ask questions such as “Who has knowledge about this bit of code? Can I make change X on code Y or would that make person Z angry?”. I did ask those questions pretty often.
  • Technical questions. The life of a GSoC student can be pretty intense, between coursework, exams and coding. For this reason, while my output was quite consistent, coding could happen at any time of the day. I’m very grateful that my mentor Nikolaj Hald Nielsen was almost always available to answer my questions, and when he wasn’t, there was a clearly appointed second-in-command I could go to. This is perhaps the most important entry in this list. Rules such as “the whole team will mentor you” or “ask in the IRC channel and someone will answer” just won’t do with first time students! I know I wasn’t very comfortable with asking just any question in IRC, especially if I felt that the answer could be something that “anybody ought to know”. Sometimes I just needed a confirmation to make sure I was doing the right thing.

To sum it up, I believe that KDE has a great admins&mentors team, and I can testify that also because of this doing GSoC for KDE was a very rewarding experience.

However, it has come to my attention (also during this year’s Google Code-in) that for the fairly small admins&mentors team a large scale student outreach program such as GSoC creates a huge workload.

KDE contributors are encouraged to help with the organization to make the recently announced GSoC 2011 the most successful GSoC ever: feel free to add your ideas to our GSoC 2011 ideas page, and if there’s an area of KDE you know well, why not be a mentor this year?

The KDE GSoC team is looking for good mentors with lots of cool ideas, and especially if you’re a former GSoC student and you’re not a student any more, you might be the perfect candidate to become a GSoC 2011 mentor. To apply as a mentor visit #kde-soc on Freenode.

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Posted by on 24/01/2011 in Amarok, GSoC2009, GSoC2010, GSoC2011, KDE

 

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A summer of transcoding for Amarok

It’s been GSoC season for over a month now and I haven’t blogged, so now I’m going to try to fix that. After last year’s Multilevel playlist sorting project, one of my proposals has been accepted again for GSoC 2010: I’m going to implement on-the-fly transcoding in Amarok.

Amarok is a music player and manager built around very general concepts of tracks and media sources. The collection tries to decouple the format from the data itself and presents the music as tracks (with metadata) rather than files. In other cases, music isn’t even stored in local files. These concepts, and others, allow one to truly rediscover music through seamless internet sources and media devices integration, and the user in fact doesn’t have to care where the actual data comes from. The many sources at one’s fingertips are accessible in a consistent way and playable from the playlist.

However, even in this day and age of stuff in the cloud, there are situations in which the user still has to worry about media formats, e.g. when acquiring new music, or copying existing music from one collection to another or from the collection to a portable music player. That’s where transcoding kicks in.

For example, one might have a quantity of Windows Media Audio files that should be transcoded to a more Free format in order to be usable in the future, or a quantity of Monkey’s Audio files, which, while lossless, are not well supported everywhere, especially in PMPs. And then of course, even if someone has a collection full of FLAC files, which is a reliable and Free codec, a conversion into a lossy format such as Ogg Vorbis or MP3 might be necessary for use with a PMP simply for reasons of storage capacity.

So my idea is this: whenever the user can copy files, give him or her the choice to either just copy, just transcode or transcode with custom options. That way, we cover both of the following use cases:

  • “I’m running late for a 4 hour train ride and I haven’t updated the music collection on my portable player, I need to quickly copy over my tunes while making sure they will compatible with the portable player”
  • “if I tweak the quality rating of the Vorbis encoder exactly the way I want it I’m going to save 1% of the space on my portable music player and still get the audio quality my sensitive ears deserve”.

The current situation is that the transcoding operation (in the strictest possible sense) works, so the next thing I have to do is integrate it nicely with Amarok’s existing collections framework. The current implementation uses FFmpeg, but I’ve placed FFmpeg-specific stuff in a wrapper class so something else could quite easily be used in the future if need arises.

The following screenshot represents the current state of the still quite unfinished transcoding GUI.

On a somewhat unrelated note, I’ve been to the  KDE Multimedia+Edu sprint in Randa, Switzerland.

It was a lot of fun and very productive too. I wish to thank the whole organizers team. Special thanks go to Mario Fux for his mad organizational skills, to the cooking team which I had the pleasure to share the kitchen with while preparing vegan stuff and to Knut Yrvin for arranging a much needed meeting with the Brisbane office of Nokia, Qt Development Frameworks regarding QtMultimedia and the future of Phonon. Finally, thanks Anne-Marie Mahfouf for a gift she gave me which allowed me to taste again something I like very much but haven’t been able to eat because of nickel allergy.

 
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Posted by on 15/06/2010 in Amarok, GSoC2010, KDE

 

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